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Ta Prohm is the modern name of what was originally called Rajavihar. Built in the Bayon style largely in the late 12th and early 13th centuries Ta Prohm was founded by King Jayavarman VII as a Mahayana Buddhist monastery and university. Unlike most renovated Angkor temples Ta Prohm has been left in pretty much the same condition in which it was found. One reason for this is that the roots and trees have become so much a part of the structures that, if removed the structures would lose their integrity. The photogenic and atmospheric combination of trees growing out of the ruins and the natural surroundings have made the temple one of Angkor's most popular with visitors. Two species predominate but sources disagree on their identification. The larger is either the silk cotton tree ceiba pentandra or Tetrameles nudiflora and the smaller is either the strangler fig (Ficus gibbosa) or Gold Apple Diospyros decandra.
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©John Lander
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Architecture
Ta Prohm is the modern name of what was originally called Rajavihar.  Built in the Bayon style largely in the late 12th and early 13th centuries Ta Prohm was founded by King Jayavarman VII as a Mahayana Buddhist monastery and university. Unlike most renovated Angkor temples Ta Prohm has been left in pretty much the same condition in which it was found.  One reason for this is that the roots and trees have become so much a part of the structures that, if removed the structures would lose their integrity.  The photogenic and atmospheric combination of trees growing out of the ruins and the natural surroundings have made the temple one of Angkor's most popular with visitors.  Two species predominate but sources disagree on their identification. The larger is either the silk cotton tree ceiba pentandra or Tetrameles nudiflora and the smaller is either the strangler fig (Ficus gibbosa)  or Gold Apple Diospyros decandra.