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The Master of the Nets Garden is among the finest gardens in Suzhou. It is recognized with other classical Suzhou gardens as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The garden demonstrates Chinese garden designers' skills for blending art, nature and architecture to create unique masterpieces. The Master of the Nets is regarded among garden connoisseurs for its mastering the techniques of relative dimension, contrast, sequence and depth. The eastern part consists of residential quarters while the gardens are located in the western part. Plants and rocks are used to create views which represent several seasons. It also includes three side courts to the east and south. The two dominant elements of the composition are the Barrier of Cloud grotto, a cypress tree dating from the Ming Dynasty, and a pine tree several centuries old. The areas to the south of the Rosy Cloud Pool were used for social activities and the areas to the north were used for intellectual activities. The buildings are laid out in a style called close to the water which is used to give the Rosy Clouds Pool the illusion of great size. Small buildings are set on rocks or piers directly over the water surface while large buildings are separated from the pool planted with trees to obscure their size.
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©John Lander
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The Master of the Nets Garden is among the finest gardens in Suzhou. It is recognized with other classical Suzhou gardens as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The garden demonstrates Chinese garden designers' skills for blending art, nature and architecture to create unique masterpieces. The Master of the Nets is regarded among garden connoisseurs for its mastering the techniques of relative dimension, contrast, sequence and depth. The eastern part consists of residential quarters while the gardens are located in the western part. Plants and rocks are used to create views which represent several seasons. It also includes three side courts to the east and south. The two dominant elements of the composition are the Barrier of Cloud grotto, a cypress tree dating from the Ming Dynasty, and a pine tree several centuries old. The areas to the south of the Rosy Cloud Pool were used for social activities and the areas to the north were used for intellectual activities. The buildings are laid out in a style called close to the water which is used to give the Rosy Clouds Pool the illusion of great size. Small buildings are set on rocks or piers directly over the water surface while large buildings are separated from the pool planted with trees to obscure their size.