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In almost all Japanese homes, temples and restaurants, one can find fusuma, which slide from side to side to redefine spaces within a room, and also act as doors. They typically measure about the same size as a tatami mat, and are two or three centimeters thick. They consist of a wooden frame, covered in cardboard and a layer of paper. They typically have a black lacquer border and an indented door handle. Historically, fusuma were painted, often with scenes from nature such as mountains, forests or animals.
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In almost all Japanese homes, temples and restaurants, one can find fusuma, which slide from side to side to redefine spaces within a room, and also act as doors. They typically measure about the same size as a tatami mat, and are two or three centimeters thick. They consist of a wooden frame, covered in cardboard and a layer of paper. They typically have a black lacquer border and an indented door handle. Historically, fusuma were painted, often with scenes from nature such as mountains,...
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