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Manshu-in also known as Manshuin Monzeki is a Tendai sect Zen Buddhist temple located near the Shugakuin Imperial Villa in Kyoto. The temple's major garden is in the Karesansui style, and now designated as an eminent scenery; it contains a notable Pinus pentaphylla tree, now about 400 years old, set within an "island" on a stream of white sand. This garden lies just south of Shugakuin Detached Palace on the grounds of the Monzekiji-in temple (a Tendai sect temple). Prince Toshihito's (who designed Katsura) second son, Yoshihisa seems to have had some connection with this garden's construction in 1656. The original buildings still stands in their original locations, and their Shoin style closely resembles that of Katsura. The garden is wrapped around both the large and small shoin, but according to Gunter Nitsche, it is best viewed from the small shoin. Its design is that of a pond garden in terms of layout, but the older Heian form has been transformed into the dry karesansui of the Edo period. An artificial Mount Horai is paired with rock groupings on its left. A stone bridge "Ishibashii" crosses a dry stream and a second bridge of stone slabs links a penninsula to a crane island in the far west. On the crane island are three undulating rock groups that resemble the nosuji of the Heian period . In front is a turtle island floating in an expanse of white gravel.
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©John Lander
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Manshu-in also known as Manshuin Monzeki is a Tendai sect Zen Buddhist temple located near the Shugakuin Imperial Villa in Kyoto.  The temple's major garden is in the Karesansui style, and now designated as an eminent scenery; it contains a notable Pinus pentaphylla tree, now about 400 years old, set within an "island" on a stream of white sand.  This garden lies just south of Shugakuin Detached Palace on the grounds of the Monzekiji-in temple (a Tendai sect temple). Prince Toshihito's (who designed Katsura) second son, Yoshihisa seems to have had some connection with this garden's construction in 1656. The original buildings still stands in their original locations, and their Shoin style closely resembles that of Katsura. The garden is wrapped around both the large and small shoin, but according to Gunter Nitsche, it is best viewed from the small shoin. Its design is that of a pond garden in terms of layout, but the older Heian form has been transformed into the dry karesansui of the Edo period. An artificial Mount Horai is paired with rock groupings on its left. A stone bridge "Ishibashii" crosses a dry stream and a second bridge of stone slabs links a penninsula to a crane island in the far west. On the crane island are three undulating rock groups that resemble the nosuji of the Heian period . In front is a turtle island floating in an expanse of white gravel.