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Folk healing is common in many places around the world. The Philippines is well known in this department because of the highland peoples who resisted Spanish colonization. Modern medical care is beyond the reach of the average islander who survives on fishing and farming which explains healers continued popularity. In these healing sessions there are no incantations. The "therapy" consists of filling a clear jar with fresh water. The "bolo bolo" practitioner places the jar and starts to blow through a metal straw into the water. Moving the jar over the head, continuing to blow. After a few minutes of this, the bolo bolo practitioner checks the clarity of the water. If it has turned brown then fresh water is put into the jar and another round is done until the water is clear. Bad spirits are removed by the rock in the water and the bubbles. Once the water is clear after 3 or 4 passes, it means a clean bill of health.
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@John Lander
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Folk healing is common in many places around the world. The Philippines is well known in this department  because of the highland peoples who resisted Spanish colonization.  Modern medical care is beyond the reach of the average islander who survives on fishing and farming which explains healers continued popularity.  In these healing sessions there are no incantations.  The "therapy" consists of filling a clear jar with fresh water. The "bolo bolo" practitioner places the jar and starts to blow through a metal straw into the water.  Moving the jar over the head, continuing to blow.  After a few minutes of this, the bolo bolo practitioner checks the clarity of the water.  If it has turned brown then fresh water is put into the jar and another round is done until the water is clear. Bad spirits are removed by the rock in the water and the bubbles.  Once the water is clear after 3 or 4 passes, it means a clean bill of health.