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The Zen Garden at the San Francisco Golden Gate Park Japanese Tea Garden was designed by Nago Sakurai, a leading Japanese landscape architect. Dry landscape gardens, often called "zen gardens" were introduced into Japan originally from China during the Kamakura Period. Japanese Zen monks, during studies in China, were impressed with landscape scrolls and rock work in Chinese gardens. So when they returned to Japan they adapted them and created what we think of today as a "zen garden" or "dry landscape garden". The sand, gravel, stones are meant ro symbolize mountains, hills, islands, rivers, oceans and ponds.
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©John Lander
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The Zen Garden at the San Francisco Golden Gate Park Japanese Tea Garden was designed by Nago Sakurai, a leading Japanese landscape architect.  Dry landscape gardens, often called "zen gardens" were introduced into Japan originally from China during the Kamakura Period.  Japanese Zen monks, during studies in China, were impressed with landscape scrolls and rock work in Chinese gardens.  So when they returned to Japan they adapted them and created what we think of today as a "zen garden" or "dry landscape garden".  The sand, gravel, stones are meant ro symbolize mountains, hills, islands, rivers, oceans and ponds.