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Cigar store Indians are a kind of advertisement figure as in the past they were used to represent tobacconists. The figures are usually wooden sculptures and normally life sized. They are still used for their original advertising purpose, though only rarely. Early store owners used to use descriptive figures to advertise their store wares. For example, red and blue barber poles to advertise barber shops. Because Native American Indians originally introduced tobacco to Europeans, it has always been associated with American Indians. Because European carvers had never seen a Native American, early tobacconist Indians looked far from the reality. Today even though both tobacco and tobacconist Indians are on the wan, they are still available for sale.
Copyright
@John Lander
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3600x5400 / 14.0MB
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Cigar store Indians are a kind of advertisement figure as in the past they were used to represent tobacconists. The figures are usually wooden sculptures and normally life sized.  They are still used for their original advertising purpose, though only rarely.  Early store owners used to use descriptive figures to advertise their store wares.  For  example, red and blue barber poles to advertise barber shops.  Because Native American Indians originally introduced tobacco to Europeans, it has always been associated with American Indians.  Because European carvers had never seen a Native American, early tobacconist Indians looked far from the reality.  Today even though both tobacco and tobacconist Indians are on the wan, they are still available for sale.