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Washi is Japanese traditional paper made from fibres of plants. Only 350 groups in Japan produce paper by hand. The nature of the fiber enables absorption of inks and dyes. Since the fibre position themselves at random, there is no consistent grain to washi which makes this type of paper resistance to creasing, tearing and wrinkling and tearing. Traditionally made Japanese paper is are acid free with some printed papers remain in good condition in Japan from 1000 years ago. For centuries, colorful designs applied by woodblock have been made for decorative use. Washi is traditionally used in screens, lamps and blinds taking advantage of its translucency. The village of Higashi Chichibu at Ogawamachi, Saitama stretches along the banks of the Ogawa River, the clear water from which traditional washi paper making has been created in this region for hundreds of years. The production of washi paper in Hosokawa-shi in Higashi Chichibu and Ogawamachi was listed by UNESCO as Human Intangible Cultural Heritage. Washi no Sato is a paper making workshop and cultural heritage centre in Higashi Chichibu where this unique paper is made, visitors can even participate in making paper. Large screens are suspended from bamboo poles resting across the rafters. Sheets of freshly moulded paper are stacked wet one on top of the other to be dried. Flower petals, ash from different kinds of wood, and different types of grasses are added to the basic pulp to create different colors and textures.
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@John Lander
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Washi is Japanese traditional paper made from fibres of plants. Only 350 groups in Japan produce paper by hand.  The nature of the fiber enables absorption of inks and dyes.  Since the fibre position themselves at random, there is no consistent grain to washi which makes this type of paper resistance to creasing, tearing and wrinkling and tearing.  Traditionally made Japanese paper is are acid free with some printed papers remain in good condition in Japan from 1000 years ago.  For centuries, colorful designs applied by woodblock have been made for decorative use.  Washi is traditionally used in screens, lamps and blinds taking advantage of its translucency. The village of Higashi Chichibu at Ogawamachi, Saitama stretches along the banks of the Ogawa River, the clear water from which traditional washi paper making has been created in this region for hundreds of years. The production of washi paper in Hosokawa-shi in Higashi Chichibu and Ogawamachi was listed by UNESCO as Human Intangible Cultural Heritage.  Washi no Sato is a paper making workshop and cultural heritage centre in Higashi Chichibu where this unique paper is made, visitors can even participate in making paper. Large screens are suspended from bamboo poles resting across the rafters. Sheets of freshly moulded paper are stacked wet one on top of the other to be dried. Flower petals, ash from different kinds of wood, and different types of grasses are added to the basic pulp to create different colors and textures.